Login
Re-characterizing the "## no critic" comments/pragmas as "annotations" throughout...
authorJeffrey Ryan Thalhammer <jeff@imaginative-software.com>
Mon, 10 Nov 2008 07:06:17 +0000 (07:06 +0000)
committerJeffrey Ryan Thalhammer <jeff@imaginative-software.com>
Mon, 10 Nov 2008 07:06:17 +0000 (07:06 +0000)
bin/perlcritic
lib/Perl/Critic.pm
lib/Perl/Critic/Annotation.pm
lib/Perl/Critic/Config.pm
lib/Perl/Critic/Document.pm
lib/Perl/Critic/Policy/Miscellanea/ProhibitUnrestrictedNoCritic.pm
lib/Perl/Critic/Policy/Miscellanea/ProhibitUselessNoCritic.pm
lib/Perl/Critic/Policy/Modules/RequireBarewordIncludes.pm

index 72cf1c6..0a5b69f 100755 (executable)
@@ -810,7 +810,7 @@ C<perlcritic> will interpret it as the number of violations to report.
 =item C<--force>
 
 Directs C<perlcritic> to ignore the magical C<"## no critic">
-pseudo-pragmas in the source code. See L<"BENDING THE RULES"> for more
+annotations in the source code. See L<"BENDING THE RULES"> for more
 information.  You can set the default value for this option in your
 F<.perlcriticrc> file.
 
@@ -1192,7 +1192,7 @@ cases, it is wise to show that you are knowingly violating the
 standards and that you have a Damn Good Reason (DGR) for doing so.
 
 To help with those situations, you can direct Perl::Critic to ignore
-certain lines or blocks of code by using pseudo-pragmas:
+certain lines or blocks of code by using annotations:
 
   require 'LegacyLibaray1.pl';  ## no critic
   require 'LegacyLibrary2.pl';  ## no critic
@@ -1211,19 +1211,19 @@ certain lines or blocks of code by using pseudo-pragmas:
       do_something($_);
   }
 
-The C<"## no critic"> comments direct Perl::Critic to ignore the
+The C<"## no critic"> annotations direct Perl::Critic to ignore the
 remaining lines of code until the end of the current block, or until a
-C<"## use critic"> comment is found (whichever comes first).  If the
-C<"## no critic"> comment is on the same line as a code statement,
+C<"## use critic"> annotation is found (whichever comes first).  If the
+C<"## no critic"> annotation is on the same line as a code statement,
 then only that line of code is overlooked.  To direct perlcritic to
-ignore the C<"## no critic"> comments, use the C<--force> option.
+ignore the C<"## no critic"> annotations, use the C<--force> option.
 
-A bare C<"## no critic"> comment disables all the active Policies.  If
+A bare C<"## no critic"> annotation disables all the active Policies.  If
 you wish to disable only specific Policies, add a list of Policy names
 as arguments just as you would for the C<"no strict"> or C<"no
 warnings"> pragma.  For example, this would disable the
 C<ProhibitEmptyQuotes> and C<ProhibitPostfixControls> policies until
-the end of the block or until the next C<"## use critic"> comment
+the end of the block or until the next C<"## use critic"> annotation
 (whichever comes first):
 
     ## no critic (EmptyQuotes, PostfixControls);
@@ -1251,9 +1251,9 @@ or disable an entire family of Policies in one shot like this:
 
 The argument list must be enclosed in parentheses and must contain one
 or more comma-separated barewords (i.e. don't use quotes).  The C<"##
-no critic"> pragmas can be nested, and Policies named by an inner
-pragma will be disabled along with those already disabled an outer
-pragma.
+no critic"> annotations can be nested, and Policies named by an inner
+annotation will be disabled along with those already disabled an outer
+annotation.
 
 Some Policies like C<Subroutines::ProhibitExcessComplexity> apply to
 an entire block of code.  In those cases, C<"## no critic"> must
index 93802f5..8017e82 100644 (file)
@@ -386,10 +386,10 @@ L<Perl::Critic::Utils::Constants/"$PROFILE_STRICTNESS_QUIET"> makes
 Perl::Critic shut up about these things.
 
 B<-force> is a boolean value that controls whether Perl::Critic
-observes the magical C<"## no critic"> pseudo-pragmas in your code.
+observes the magical C<"## no critic"> annotations in your code.
 If set to a true value, Perl::Critic will analyze all code.  If set to
 a false value (which is the default) Perl::Critic will ignore code
-that is tagged with these comments.  See L<"BENDING THE RULES"> for
+that is tagged with these annotations.  See L<"BENDING THE RULES"> for
 more information.  You can set the default value for this option in
 your F<.perlcriticrc> file.
 
@@ -702,7 +702,7 @@ cases, it is wise to show that you are knowingly violating the
 standards and that you have a Damn Good Reason (DGR) for doing so.
 
 To help with those situations, you can direct Perl::Critic to ignore
-certain lines or blocks of code by using pseudo-pragmas:
+certain lines or blocks of code by using annotations:
 
     require 'LegacyLibaray1.pl';  ## no critic
     require 'LegacyLibrary2.pl';  ## no critic
@@ -721,19 +721,19 @@ certain lines or blocks of code by using pseudo-pragmas:
         do_something($_);
     }
 
-The C<"## no critic"> comments direct Perl::Critic to ignore the
+The C<"## no critic"> annotations direct Perl::Critic to ignore the
 remaining lines of code until the end of the current block, or until a
-C<"## use critic"> comment is found (whichever comes first).  If the
-C<"## no critic"> comment is on the same line as a code statement,
-then only that line of code is overlooked.  To direct perlcritic to
-ignore the C<"## no critic"> comments, use the C<-force> option.
+C<"## use critic"> annotation is found (whichever comes first).  If the
+C<"## no critic"> annotation is on the same line as a code statement,
+then only that line of code is overlooked.  To direct this Critic to
+ignore the C<"## no critic"> annotations, use the C<-force> option.
 
-A bare C<"## no critic"> comment disables all the active Policies.  If
+A bare C<"## no critic"> annotation disables all the active Policies.  If
 you wish to disable only specific Policies, add a list of Policy names
 as arguments, just as you would for the C<"no strict"> or C<"no
 warnings"> pragmas.  For example, this would disable the
 C<ProhibitEmptyQuotes> and C<ProhibitPostfixControls> policies until
-the end of the block or until the next C<"## use critic"> comment
+the end of the block or until the next C<"## use critic"> annotation
 (whichever comes first):
 
   ## no critic (EmptyQuotes, PostfixControls)
@@ -761,9 +761,9 @@ or disable an entire family of Policies in one shot like this:
 
 The argument list must be enclosed in parentheses and must contain one
 or more comma-separated barewords (e.g. don't use quotes).  The
-C<"## no critic"> pragmas can be nested, and Policies named by an
-inner pragma will be disabled along with those already disabled an
-outer pragma.
+C<"## no critic"> annotations can be nested, and Policies named by an
+inner annotation will be disabled along with those already disabled an
+outer annotation.
 
 Some Policies like C<Subroutines::ProhibitExcessComplexity> apply to
 an entire block of code.  In those cases, C<"## no critic"> must
@@ -776,9 +776,9 @@ appear on the line where the violation is reported.  For example:
 Policies such as C<Documentation::RequirePodSections> apply to the
 entire document, in which case violations are reported at line 1.
 
-Use this feature wisely.  C<"## no critic"> should be used in the
+Use this feature wisely.  C<"## no critic"> annotations should be used in the
 smallest possible scope, or only on individual lines of code. And you
-should always be as specific as possible about which policies you want
+should always be as specific as possible about which Policies you want
 to disable (i.e. never use a bare C<"## no critic">).  If Perl::Critic
 complains about your code, try and find a compliant solution before
 resorting to this feature.
index 7fbc0e1..59138b6 100644 (file)
@@ -59,7 +59,7 @@ sub _init {
     $self->{_disabled_policies} = \%disabled_policies;
 
     # Grab surrounding nodes to determine the context.
-    # This determines whether the pragma applies to
+    # This determines whether the annotation applies to
     # the current line or the block that follows.
     my $annotation_line = $annotation_element->location()->[0];
     my $parent = $annotation_element->parent();
@@ -222,7 +222,7 @@ __END__
 
 =head1 NAME
 
-Perl::Critic::Annotation - Represents a "## no critic" marker
+Perl::Critic::Annotation - Represents a "## no critic" annotation
 
 =head1 SYNOPSIS
 
@@ -238,11 +238,11 @@ Perl::Critic::Annotation - Represents a "## no critic" marker
   
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
 
-L<Perl::Critic::Annotation> represents a single C<"## no critic"> marker in a
-L<PPI:Document>.  The Annotation takes care of parsing the markers and 
+L<Perl::Critic::Annotation> represents a single C<"## no critic"> annotation in a
+L<PPI:Document>.  The Annotation takes care of parsing the annotation and 
 keeps track of which lines and Policies it affects. It is intended to
-encapsulate the details of the no-critic markers, and to provide a way for 
-Policy objects to interact with the markers (via a L<Perl::Critic::Document>).
+encapsulate the details of the no-critic annotations, and to provide a way for 
+Policy objects to interact with the annotations (via a L<Perl::Critic::Document>).
 
 =head1 CLASS METHODS
 
index 38630dd..88996f9 100644 (file)
@@ -879,7 +879,7 @@ L<Perl::Critic::Utils::Constants/"$PROFILE_STRICTNESS_QUIET"> makes
 Perl::Critic shut up about these things.
 
 B<-force> controls whether Perl::Critic observes the magical C<"## no
-critic"> pseudo-pragmas in your code.  If set to a true value,
+critic"> annotations in your code.  If set to a true value,
 Perl::Critic will analyze all code.  If set to a false value (which is
 the default) Perl::Critic will ignore code that is tagged with these
 comments.  See L<Perl::Critic/"BENDING THE RULES"> for more
index 4d48382..12eefa0 100644 (file)
@@ -220,7 +220,7 @@ sub line_is_disabled_for_policy {
     my $policy_name = ref $policy || $policy;
 
     # HACK: This Policy is special.  If it is active, it cannot be
-    # disabled by a "## no critic" marker.  Rather than create a general
+    # disabled by a "## no critic" annotation.  Rather than create a general
     # hook in Policy.pm for enabling this behavior, we chose to hack
     # it here, since this isn't the kind of thing that most policies do
 
@@ -333,7 +333,7 @@ sub _disable_shebang_fix {
     # inserts some magical code into the top of the file (just after the
     # shebang).  This code allows people to call your script using a shell,
     # like `sh my_script`.  Unfortunately, this code causes several Policy
-    # violations, so we disable them as if they had "## no critic" markers.
+    # violations, so we disable them as if they had "## no critic" annotations.
 
     my $first_stmnt = $self->schild(0) || return;
 
index 4b43d4d..9407a27 100644 (file)
@@ -69,14 +69,14 @@ distribution.
 
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
 
-A bare C<## no critic> marker will disable B<all> the active Policies.  This
+A bare C<## no critic> annotation will disable B<all> the active Policies.  This
 creates holes for other, unintended violations to appear in your code.  It is
 better to disable B<only> the particular Policies that you need to get around.
 By putting Policy names in a comma-separated list after the C<## no critic>
-marker, then it will only disable the named Policies.  Policy names are
+annotation, then it will only disable the named Policies.  Policy names are
 matched as regular expressions, so you can use shortened Policy names, or
 patterns that match several Policies. This Policy generates a violation any
-time that an unrestricted C<## no critic> marker appears.
+time that an unrestricted C<## no critic> annotation appears.
 
   ## no critic                     # not ok
   ## no critic ''                  # not ok
index 5788d43..f8d5ae7 100644 (file)
@@ -73,7 +73,7 @@ __END__
 
 =head1 NAME
 
-Perl::Critic::Policy::Miscellanea::ProhibitUselessNoCritic - Remove ineffective "## no critic" markers.
+Perl::Critic::Policy::Miscellanea::ProhibitUselessNoCritic - Remove ineffective "## no critic" annotations.
 
 =head1 AFFILIATION
 
index 4782270..5924f9d 100644 (file)
@@ -96,7 +96,7 @@ use C<require>, but still encourages you to write '*.pm' modules.
 Sometimes, you may want to load modules at run-time, but you don't
 know at design-time exactly which module you will need to load
 (L<Perl::Critic|Perl::Critic> is an example of this).  In that case,
-just attach the C<'## no critic'> pseudo-pragma like so:
+just attach the C<'## no critic'> annotation like so:
 
     require $module_name;  ## no critic